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Funding to share Indigenous knowledge / Fire and land management

As part of the Morrison Government’s $200 million Wildlife and Bushfire Habitat Recovery fund, Indigenous organisations and Traditional Owner groups can now apply for grant funding to run workshops, build understanding and share knowledge of Indigenous fire and land management practices.

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Up to $2 million AUD is being made available through grants to support Indigenous led knowledge exchange of Indigenous fire and land management practices.

The Indigenous Fire and Land Management Workshops Program is available Australia wide to Traditional Owners and Indigenous enterprises to strengthen and share Traditional Knowledge and practices.

As part of the Morrison Government’s $200 million Wildlife and Bushfire Habitat Recovery fund, Indigenous organisations and Traditional Owner groups can now apply for grant funding to run workshops, build understanding and share knowledge of Indigenous fire and land management practices.

This includes the use of Indigenous burning techniques which can mitigate fire risk, reduce fuel loads, control weeds, promote growth in native pastures, strengthen biodiversity outcomes and provide environmental and cultural benefits.

Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management, David Littleproud, said Indigenous fire management had an important role to play in bushfire prevention strategies as the Morrison Government invests more than $2 billion in helping communities, businesses and the environment recover from the devastation caused last summer.

Grants from $20,000 to $200,000 are available.

Eligible projects must include the delivery of Indigenous led workshops to address one or more of the following:

  • Strengthening traditional fire and land management knowledge within Indigenous communities
  • Developing actions to safeguard traditional fire and land management knowledge, including through engagement and knowledge sharing protocols
  • Collaboration between Indigenous communities, fire and land management partners and interested parties to share knowledge, improve understanding and inclusion of Indigenous fire and land management practice in conventional fire and land management arrangements
  • Developing partnerships between Indigenous communities and fire and land managers to address barriers to implementing Indigenous fire and land management practices

Projects must be completed by 1 April 2022 and the maximum project period is 12 months.

Grant guidelines and application criteria, along with a sample application, are now available at https://www.business.gov.au/IFLM(link is external)

Online applications open 2 November 2020 and close 10 December 2020.